Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Inspiring women in beauty - so is corporate setting us back?

I just spent a really inspiring, great week in L.A. surrounded by brilliant women who have forged a way in the beauty industry and founded great brands, all outside of the realm of the traditional 'corporate' atmosphere. These women are doing it all their own way and making huge successes as they go.

Between the jetlag and the time in the hotel room, I get a lot of thinking time when I'm travelling alone, mainly because I don't have about 10 people saying 'Mum', or 'Love, have you seen my phone/wallet/keys?'.

After every meeting on this trip I came away thinking 'Wow. This is how I want to do it.' These women are a formidable force.


Petra Strand, founded Pixi and opened their flagship store in London over 15 years ago and now runs the company from their LA offices, where they service their main account in the USA, Target. The UK business is surging ahead with the launch of the Skintreats range in Marks & Spencer and QVC opening last year to immediate sell-outs. The business continues to go from strength to strength, with Petra guiding the way based solely on her instincts and her knowledge of her customer.


May Lindstrom - I met May for the first time on this trip, and like Petra, May is obviously the Boss in the office, and her staff treat each other like family. Last August May shut down her entire business, including the office and online sales, to give her staff a two week complete break from work. She plans to repeat it this year, acknowledging that the health of her business is dependent on the health and happiness of her team. She has also removed her brand from all discounting across her partner retailers, indirectly positioning herself alongside brands like Chanel, who you simply never see doing 'sale'. May has a very set plan of where she sees her brand, holding tight onto her retail outlets, preferring quality over quantity.


Michelle Phan, arguably the first YouTube female megastar, launched her own MCN in 2012, has done makeup collaborations with Lancome and helped organise Gen Beauty. Her company Ipsy, has 1.5 million subscribers in the USA and is valued at over $500 million. She's also very nice IRL. Every single fan at Gen Beauty was greeted with a smile and a selfie without hesitation. She's smart.


Carisa Janes founded Hourglass Cosmetics 10 years ago, launching one product into Barneys in New York. I spent a good hour in the Hourglass flagship store in Venice, CA on Monday (if you haven't been, you must) and the attention to detail is beautiful. To my mind, Hourglass OWN the previously-ignored powder market and you just know Lauder, L'Oreal and LVMH have their cheque books ready. And if they don't, they're morons.


January Olds, facialist and founder of January Labs, worked behind the scenes of other brands before launching her own line. She develops products that her spa clients want, rather than what marketing teams dream up.


April Gargiulo founded Vintner's Daughter after searching for a highly active yet natural, potent serum when she couldn't find what she wanted in her local beauty stores. She is in no rush to develop further products and is completely in control of her brand, something that fits in perfectly while she raises her two very small children.

After spending time with these women, I came away thinking how great it would be if women like this were not only running their own brands, but big 'corporate' beauty. Imagine the changes in big business if decisions were based around shared personal experiences, and empathy and understanding for your main client - being women - because you had been through the very same thing yourself. Yes, the men's market is growing, but women are the biggest beauty consumers. It's our market.

Time and time again, when you hear of the 'big' jobs in beauty becoming available, they nearly always go to men. Middle-aged white men to be exact. Why? Are you telling me that nowhere in the industry was there a female that could do that role? Nonsense. And buyers in certain areas (not all). Too many times I've had a meeting with a male buyer that had been transferred from bedding, that literally had no clue what I was talking about when referencing comparative brands. It would be like me taking a job in gaming or the car industry. I'd literally be:


Even one of our own professional 'bodies', previously only open to women, have taken in men, leading to myself and a lot of friends letting our membership slide. 


Opening the email 'informing us of their decision' like:

Never mind. I'm sure they won't miss us. ;)


I'll leave on a positive note from my good friend Maleka, the founder of Merumaya, who I spoke to at length today on this subject.



'How we actively support one another in our endeavours is so important. We need to be doing more of this at every level. Retailers, bloggers/vloggers, media, influencers, customers, women2women; supporting women in business (not just the ones that are already successful or who have a celebrity clientele), supporting small businesses and local businesses and encouraging, with all your heart, those individuals, that had the courage to put all they have on the line and pursue their dreams. And then to celebrate those women when they have been successful, to share those examples of success with each other and our own daughters, so that they are encouraged to be entrepreneurial, brave, secure, unafraid of failure, positive, compassionately supportive, creative, successful and happy.'

AMEN.



88 comments:

  1. Amen! So good to hear about those amazing creators who don't let anyone pressure them into making discounts or sacrifice quality for quantity!

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    1. I agree and so hard to do in this retail climate.

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  2. Really excellent post, Caroline.

    Another up-and-coming entrepreneur of note is Florence Adepoju, a young woman (from the UK, I believe) who was recently featured in The New York Times. Disappointed that she could not find lipsticks suitable for her own dark skin (yes -- this is still a problem in this day and age) she got a degree in cosmetic chemistry, set up a workshop in her parents garage, and began to make her own. Wait! Isn't this how Apple and Microsoft started? When I read the Times article, memories of being young, loving makeup, and not being able to find anything that worked on brown skin came flooding back to me. I immediately went online and bought several of this young woman's lipsticks because they're gorgeous AND because I want to support her efforts. She's already selling in Colette, Nasty Gal,and Topshop. I'm expecting great things from her in the future.

    As a businesswoman myself, I feel that women do best when we take the reins of our destiny in hand. If we wait for men to "give" us anything, we'll be waiting for a long damn time.

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  3. Love this! I feel happier buying products from companies like this as well. You don't just feel like its a massive organisation that just want to see the colour of your money. A little hand wrote note last week from Alpha H with my order telling my to enjoy the products was a touch that made me think. This is still a family run business that cares. Too many companies that were once good have became too big for the boots and lost this caring touch.

    Looking forward to seeing your vlogs from LA as I'm visiting next month!

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    1. Ah Alpha-H have a great woman at the helm! :)

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  4. Love this!! Such a great post. Very inspiring.

    Alina
    www.eclecticalu.blogspot.com

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  5. Great post. I am struck by the lack of diversity. Hope that changes too.

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  6. Superb! Food for thought as always Caroline. Thank you.

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  7. I was looking at buying the problem solver from May Lindstrom earlier and was trying to work out whether it would be worth the money. Now I know what she's like with her team it makes me want to purchase her products as a way of solidarity to brilliant women!

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  8. Such a lovely, informative and positive post. Thanks Caroline!

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  9. This is very, very inspiring! Caroline, speaking of women in the beauty industry, I live in Boston and my aesthetician, Lavinia Borcau has developed a line of organic skincare products that are amazing! I've been using them for years and my skin looks incredible. Over the years I have developed an understanding of ingredients, so I know that what she is using is great for the skin. Anyway, we need help getting the word out and wondering how to get that help, where to start.She sells them in her spa and also online but this brand should grow much faster. Her on-line clients come back and order more.

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    1. Hi Luca,

      Word of mouth is always great - I would ask her customers to ask for her products in local dept stores, create a demand. :)

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  10. Rather "plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose"...Helena Rubenstein,Madame C.J. Walker,Estee Lauder,Elizabeth Arden,anyone? Many successful entrepreneurs have to choose between how big they want to be vs.how to control their vision/brand. Now,the fact that corporations disproportionately reward the white male isn't exactly news (as you well know) but thanks for putting some focus on this fact on your blog.
    Personally I try to do some research on the cos. I purchase from. Being a woman owned company is a plus,but there are other metrics,too.

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    1. Of course! I would never suggest only buying from women, I have lots of male friends in the industry ;)
      Cx

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  11. So much of the feminist 'chat' these days is anti men- I find it so boring. What I find exciting and inspiring is simply 'for women' as in, if they do the job best- it should be a no brainier. I know that often it can be made more complicated but it really isn't. I don't understand how big corporate companies would allow a man to do a job if a woman would do it better- do they not care about making money??? Xx💅

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    1. They obviously do care about money since they continue to rake it in don't they? Loreal, Estée Lauder are not going bust. Why shouldn't business men be allowed to take top jobs in beauty companies. Would women want to be told they shouldn't be allowed in top jobs in like the sports car industry? I just looked up that the 2 women creators and founder of benefit cosmetics chose a man to be CEO, will we hold that against them? Are there studies on women executives leading global beauty companies better? I'm sure it takes more than passion for cosmetics to lead global companies. I'm looking at a list of Beauty's 50 most powerful women and there are women CEOs, exec chairman, group president, exec VP (lvmh cosmetics and Dior couture, bare essentials, uni lever North America, Bobbi brown, walgreens, Chanel, Ulta, Macy's, Estée Lauder Cos, loreal, physicians formula, clinique, it cosmetics, Nordstrom, Newman Marcus, shudeido America, Josie Marian, Avon, bath and body works, saks, philosophy, Charlotte tilbury, , Mac, urban decay, Target etc). Maybe we should learn more from and about them than quickly concluding that there are not that many women at the top in the beauty industry. Also I get that we want some things just for women only, but in many cases if men just want men only things, a lot of feminists accuse them of being sexist and yell discrimination so to me that seems unfair.

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    2. I couldn't agree more! I was kind of shocked when Caroline suggested men taking jobs in beauty buying would be like her taking a job in the car industry..... Um what?

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    3. Hi Jessica! I meant: because I have no experience in that area. Not because I'm a woman! I hope that clears it up. I could have also said 'working in dentistry or furniture making' - I meant purely because I have no experience in that area except for driving a car/buying the games for my kids. I hope that clarifies? X

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    4. Caroline, I understand what your'e saying but i think that your comments about industries show a lack of understanding of business at the top level. People do not have to be industry experts whey they take top jobs, more importantly is their knowledge of business strategy, their experience in SUCCESSFUL business strategy and a host of other "soft skills" I guess you'd call them... of course people do indeed get jobs they shouldn't really have got, but that's life. Industry moves for executive members have been and will continue to be successful simply because huge corporations don't require you to be able to sell a bottle of moisturiser or know what's in it - they require you to have a knowledge of all the behind the scenes things that make a big business successful. In fact, you know i've just noticed, your article with the women you've used as good examples are all effectively small business owners - when we see those businesses get big it'll probably be due to the fact that big corps have purchased them, the kind of skill to make a successful purchase is the kind of skill that is being looked for when large companies make acquisitions. I hope perhaps that clarifies why seemingly inexperienced men are getting top jobs in multi-billion dollar industries - they have many many many industry experts in jobs around them to SELL the product and i think your focus and experienced is at that level of the business and therefore so are your opinions about it.

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    5. Ammit, thank you for your comment, but please be assured I am fully aware of how business runs at the top level, in beauty and across all spheres. I can only assume you have no idea of my experience, nor should you have, and have therefore based your opinion around your assumptions, which are incorrect.

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    6. I'll quote you a couple of times: "It's our market" and "all too often women do the ground work but ultimately men make the decisions". What are you basing a) the sexist first comment on about it being our market and b) the sweeping statement about men making all the decisions? This kind of feminism is damaging and it should be challenged so i am sorry if I am irritating you but i am challenging your viewpoint from the viewpoint of another woman who does not think that writing articles with "this is ours and we resent men leading" is the right approach or even view to have (but you're entitled to it nonetheless). Business is business whether you are selling cars or bb cream and the best person for the job of growing that business, which ultimately wishes to make money should be literally THE best person for that job be it man or woman. If you are aware of how things operate top level you simply wouldn't be talking about it being men that make all the decisions, they really don't unless you're basing this off something specific that annoyed you and is not mentioned in your article. You say you've let memberships slide because men have been involved - really? Based on gender inclusion and your resent of men being involved? If men did that or wrote this we as a gender, go apesh1t and start digging up Suffragettes from their graves. Comment by someone else "It feels strange to see so many men in charge when they don't even care about it" - really ladies? It's business!!!! Am I going mad that i'm the only person who sees that? And within the EL offices around the world i wonder how many women are in extremely high up positions? Shall we find out? Here is a link: Please note the credentials each person has that puts them in their position (pretty much nobody is listed as expert bb cream tester) - and oh look, there are ladies there too!! http://www.elcompanies.com/Pages/Our-Leaders.aspx

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    7. Women make up the majority of beauty buyers. That's just a fact. It's not sexist to point out a fact. And men hold the majority of positions higher up the chain. That is also fact, one that you nicely proved with the link you provided, where 3/9 were women. A third. Although in fairness to ELC, it's a family run business, and the family just happens to be headed by the sons of Estée. So not the best example, although that doesn't make it irrelevant. And my membership situation was because it was a charitable exercise set up by women for women, to help women get up the ladder and build women's careers through mentoring and networking via women who had been in the industry longer. I'm off to enjoy my weekend, I hope you have a good one.

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  12. It always felt strange to see so many men in charge when it is a subject most men barely care about, but it seems to be that way wherever you look. Even if there are significantly more women in a certain business, the leading position is mostly taken by men.

    Linda, Libra, Loca: Beauty, Baby and Backpacking

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    1. Exactly this. All too often the women do the ground work and the day-to-day, but ultimately a man makes the decision. Annoying!

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  13. Great post, Caroline! We are all still waiting for your skincare line now..... :)

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  14. Great post, thank you (I work in a 99% male dominated sector myself). Lisa Eldridge @ Lancome!

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  15. Your best post to date in my not so humble opinion. Thank you

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  16. Great post caroline giving these great women the credit they deserve..may i recomend a female owned make up brand?? LILLY LOLO..its fantastic mineral make up great for problem skins natural ingredients their range is so good and also so affordable..also the owner comes from my home town..check it out you wont look back..cant wait for this weeks l.a.vlog.

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  17. Caroline,Such a great post.I am a recent subscriber from Huntsville,Alabama.I just adore you,and I love all your youtube video's. Thanks for all the hard work and research you do for all your "adoring subscribers"!! Hope you have a fabulous week.. Hugs,Elaine

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  18. Such a wonderful post Caroline. I love that you added these amazing people as inspirations and love it xo

    http://www.kinikunormal.blogspot.com/

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  19. LOVED this. I'm trying to get a job in the beauty industry in NYC right now. Hope I can be like these women.

    PS I'm SO anxious to hear about what you think of the rest of May's line. What to buy and what to not? :)

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    1. Just buy it all. Hard to go wrong to be honest!

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  20. I looked up the CEOs of Loreal & Estée Lauder, despite their genders they seem very accomplished business men and obviously their brands are successful. The board would be focusing on business really. There are many factors why not many women don't reach executive level not always discriminatory. I saw this video of a feminist who blamed men for women not excelling in Science & Engineering. If we expect women to not be scared to choose careers which are men's domain Eg science why would we limit men if they choose careers that we consider women's domain? The best thing about the post is highlighting successful women. I feel they prove that they made it and not complaining that men hindered them from success. i don't think that there are serious discrimination against women. Surely promotion should be about merit rather than filling a gender quota or for so called sake of equality. I'm not saying a woman CEO wouldn't be a great thing for Loreal but can't imply that the current CEO being a man can't possibly do a good job because he doesn't wear makeup.

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    1. i don't believe that Caroline was saying that men, by their nature, can't do a good job within the beauty industry. The glass ceiling has been well-documented throughout academia and the media, so I beg to disagree that discrimination is nonexistent. The operant word here is "opportunity." We, as women, need to create opportunities for ourselves, as the women in the examples have done, in order to forge ahead successfully. To remark on the disproportionate number of men in administrative and executive positions within the cosmetics industry is not to propose that we "limit men." We know for a fact that there are just as many capable women that could fill those positions but are not being offered the opportunities.

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    2. I think for the most part, the media loves to put against each other, women vs men, black vs white, straight vs LGBT. I didn't say that discrimination is nonexistent, I just don't believe it's the main issue why not as many women reach executive level in the corporate world in all industries not just beauty. Look up the research of Claudia Goldin and Christina Hoff Sommers who have debunked the pay gap issue. like this article http://www.washingtonexaminerr.com/harvard-prof.-takes-down-gender-wage-gap-myth/article/2580405 and this http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/11527238/Meet-the-feminist-who-is-sticking-up-for-men.html From my personal experience working in the corporate world, often womens worst enemy are themselves or other women eg bringing their personal dramas to work, to gossiping against each other and cliques. how do you know for a fact how many qualified women can fill executive positions but were not interviewed? i didnt see any statistics in this post. have you experienced this personally? i personally have not felt discrimnated as a woman in job opportunities, ive felt ive missed out more for being a reserved person or because i was told i was too young, so clients may not accept advice from me. it seems even college education does not give you advantage as people with no degrees have same pay and position.

      men get discriminated as well. many dont get good opportunities either thats why we there are more cases where the woman is the main breadwinners.

      i have a colleague who worked for a bank for 25 years, he chose to step down from his executive position, because the bank wanted to appoint a younger woman who dont even have half of the experience he has for their diversity/equality strategy. do you think that's fair? he was offered a redundancy or lower position, after 25 years of service.

      .i would be interested hear more from employers and boards to hear more about this issue rather than the media and feminists. it seems like the media and feminists do want to limit men from executive positions as they pressure companies to hire or promote women. thats why most application forms ask if you're a woman, minority or disabled due to equal opportunity act (in Australia).

      also a lot of prime jobs are about who you know rather than what you know, so how is that fair?

      It's also unrealistic to think there will be a point where there will be 0 discrimination or 100% equality. i personally believe that sucess is an individual effort, not about gender, race or anything else. everyone has obstacles, but not everyone fails. today, young women that i worked with complained about gender inequality pay, pay gaps and not equal opportunity and yet they leave exactly at closing time, complain about their work, dating problems on everyday basis and have degrees that do not relate whatsoever to what they're doing. what are their chances to making it to the top, if they continue with that type of work ethic, no clear career plan and attitude?

      the more that we tell women that there are glass ceilings, wouldnt they just become more discouraged? think it's more positive to promote that message from Meluka to encourage women to be brave, be pro active and make their own opportunities, support each other etc.

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    3. I agree that the message from Maleka is what we should focus on, that's why I spoke to her and included it. No-one is asking for anyone to be given an unfair shot at a position just because they are female. I'm saying that there is no chance in hell that a woman with zero tech experience would be given the job as CEO/MD etc of a tech company in the way that men are given top jobs in beauty. It just doesn't happen. And the women I know, including myself, don't 'complain' about everything and leave early. Quite the opposite. Starting the conversation on a big platform isn't complaining, it's starting the conversation, which is the great thing about having a blog space. :)

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    4. I think this was far more eloquently put than I did, I love seeing women highlighted in posts like this. I love May Lindstroms approach to everything (or at least what i've seen of it) but i don't like the comparison against men. It's an interesting debate for sure.

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  21. Quite an inspiring post on these exceptional women in beauty! I love hearing about women creating these phenomenal products and marching to their own beat.
    The Beauty Bloss

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  22. I loved this post, so good to get an insight into these brands, some of which I enjoy using, makes them feel even better that they are well run nice companies owned and managed by women. I am not down on men just pro women especially when it's producing quality products aimed mainly at women, I think they would care more somehow...they get it...

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    1. Exactly Rebecca! I LOVE men. I just want to support women as much as possible xx

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  23. Yes, Caroline!!! This is why I became a subscriber, you share my worldview! Lovely post and very well spoken. The world is ours for the taking, if only we recognize our strength and power.

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  24. Give it a few years and WO(men)will be leading the world, the goddesses are awakening on all fronts and they are fierce but compassionate and loving:))

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  25. Give it a few years and WO(men) will be leading the world. The goddesses are awakening, they are fierce but loving and compassionate:))

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  26. I wouldn't normally bother commenting on blog posts but this was fabulous. As a newly graduated chemist (who is obsessed with reading over product ingredients) I would love the chance to get into the beauty industry and work on product development etc and it's an inspiration to see these women be so successful! Thanks Caroline! (And thank you for introducing me to acid toning, my skin will forever be grateful.)

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  27. THANKS FOR KEEPING IT REAL CAROLINE! you are the absolute bomb

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  28. I really enjoyed this post Caroline. Mostly it has me wondering as a successful woman who would love to become a higher up in corporate, where do I start? I think sometimes this is part of the problem is not being aware of opportunities that lead you to these type of positions. Just PART of the problem. I would love a follow up post that would expand on this topic for woman who would like to pursue these kind of careers and where to start.

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    1. Thank you - will have a think :) x

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    2. Percy and peaches, I would recommend "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg as a good source. She talks about mentoring and women in business and corporate. I had quite a bit of success moving up the corporate ladder of a $500+ million per year company prior to starting my own company, and I agree whole heartedly with what she says on the subject (both what not to do, as well as what to do). Hope this helps! And good luck to you :)

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  29. Feel inspired and energised. Great post x

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  30. I am always sure to enjoy your behind the scenes peak posts. Great topic and fantastically exposed.

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  31. Hi Caroline! I'm sorry this is not about the content of this post but I have a question and the comments on the rutine page are disable :( My question is: in what stage of the night routine should masks go?

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  32. this is inspiring, reminds me of an article about alpha women https://kovla.com/blog/what-s-being-an-alpha-female/ how its like to be one of them!we are in the 21 century and we men are trying to understand how women think, thats why i read articles like yours!thank you

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  33. This is such a great post. I work in a male dominated industry (construction) and am constantly pigeon holed by other men in the industry who assume I must be the secretary or PA. I'm actually the Operations Director, if you want to work with or for us it me you have to impress. I don't care what your gender is, show me you can do a good job and you're in. I'm proud to say we have used numerous female trades people and specialists and they have all been wonderful, not just because they were good at their jobs but because they understand (empathise) with our clients and what whatever we are building means to them. Its time we started challenging men on their turf as well as more traditionally female sectors.

    Now, if someone can recommend a good hand and nail treatment, Id love to hear about it. The cement dust plays havoc with my hands!

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    1. Ha MrsB, Good work! Construction eh? Good for you. What country do you live in so we can recommend something to take care of those hands? LOL

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  34. I hate this kind of article Caroline, I'm sorry. I love your blog but you're a no sh1t lady and i'll give you my no sh1t opinion by saying that I'm sick of seeing women complain that more women aren't getting big jobs in the corp world. So what that men have the big jobs in cosmetics, it's business and apparently women would rather hold pow wows with one another about how few of us are taking the big jobs and how we're worse off than I don't know...actually work towards those jobs. I work in corporate and in a male industry (technology) and abhore the "women in silicon valley" sisterhood crap that I get sent all the time, the surveys i get based on my gender and the "we should have more women in x industry" - I believe in the best person for the job regardless of what gender they are and that's all, i have no comment on how good men are in the cosmetics industry and I have no wish to moan about them not deserving the role and how a woman would be so much better. Would she really!? Not necessarily. It's a business and women are showing themselves to want to spend more time moaning and less time doing anything that might get them to the top spots. I'm fed up of this gender thing, I don't see men holding these moaning sessions, I do see women wanting equality and then complaining when the door isn't held open for them though. Sort it out ladies. I mean look at the comments on this thread about how women should have so much more and how hard done by we are. Nope, sorry, it won't fly in business. I highly doubt that the business women you have featured in this post think about gender gaps...they just do what they want to do and that is the key. Forget about gender, it is irrelevant!!

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    1. Hi Ammit!
      Thank you for commenting and I completely understand where you are coming from. I am sure the women featured in this post don't complain about gender because they've started their own companies, in some cases because of the gender issue. Of course men don't have to hold these 'moaning' sessions, they're not, for the most part, oppressed in the business world.
      I am talking specifically about women who are equally qualified, if not more than a man who is then given the job. No-one I know is asking for any doors to be held open for them. Thank you for commenting but I could not disagree more that 'gender is irrelevant', although I greatly look forward to the day that it is! And I tip my hat to you for working in tech. Not sure I could do it with a calm head ;)
      Cx

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    2. Wow!! Thats like saying institutional racism does not exist because we say so. Women are not sitting around moaning - there are many successful women out there who work their asses off. Sexism in the corporate world is not imagined and no matter how much you call it "crap" does not mean it goes away. IMO when women say there is no such thing as sexism thats akin to saying "yes, women are not hired for these jobs because they are not qualified to the extent that men are" Bullocks.

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    3. I'm going on MY experiences Nicky as a woman who works in a mans industry. Some of the very best teachers and managers i've ever had are men. We all draw our views from experience. The problem with your vitriol against what i wrote is that nowhere in my original comment did I ever say sexism doesn't exist, i believe it does and i believe it's experienced every day for both men and women in fact, not JUST women. What i have the problem with is the way women are handling it. I have no time for pandering or complaining that men have all the good jobs and poor us. If we want to overcome something the answer is not to constantly talk about it and acknowledge it, it's to say yes it exists but we're going to get the hell on with it anyway. That's what has worked for me and that gains you one thing that constant article writing about how awful it all is won't... it's called respect.

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    4. I don't see that Nicky had any 'vitriol', just an opinion. And the 'constant article writing' ? - I've done one in nearly 6 years. I'm having a conversation, not whining and complaining, as you can see from the comments.

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    5. Not you specifically Caroline... I'm actually talking about the whole movement. The background on this for me is that I get TONS of articles and surveys shoved my way based on linkedin and my job industry.... so that's where it's coming from, it isn't actually coming from this article specifically i should have made that more clear when i wrote my response. My issue is with the "global" way that this is handled, and i wouldn't come near this blog if I saw what i'm complaining about, it merely triggered my view on the issue generally. I hope that clarifies.

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  35. Agree whole heartedly with this post. Have recently been listening to audio book "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg and she speaks extensively about her own experiences with gender roles not only in the field of technology (Google, Facebook, yahoo are all part of her resume), but she also cites several research case studies on the subject. I am an entrepreneur and CEO myself, and initially rolled my eyes when hearing about gender roles, however, many of the situations she describes have actually happened to me as well (negotiating pay and contracts in particular) and her words had me shouting a "hell yeah" while speed walking at the park. It's a conversation we need to remain a part of, not just for ourselves, but for daughters and generations to come.

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  36. Amen! I actually had the opposite problem, I recently got promoted in an extremely male dominated job (IT - only female in office of 40) and not 1 but 2 men suggested to me that I got the promotion because I am a women and they 'needed to show a bit of equality'. I am all for hiring and promoting the best person for the job, but if women are constantly being passed up for men when they are just as qualified and just as good as there job and yet women who do succeed in those jobs give others the opinion that they only did it 'because they have to' means there is never a level playing field. Its still so sad that in 2016 we still have to prove ourselves alot more than men to get even close to the same amount of recognition

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  37. I work for a company in Australia called Mecca Cosmetica (similar concept to SpaceNK) which is headed by an AMAZING woman called Jo Horgan. Look her up on YouTube if you don't already know her; she's intelligent, articulate, passionate and utterly inspiring. Major girl crush.

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